Types of Donations

Scientists are looking for donors who are committed to helping them find potentially life-saving therapies and treatments! Below is a list of donations you may be interested in participating in. If you are interested in donating, click here to schedule your appointment or contact us at (800) 347-4927.

Your donation will help ensure that a variety of human cells crucial to research projects are available to scientists. These cells may lead to the development of potentially life-saving therapies and treatments.

Eligibility Requirements
In order to donate, you must meet the requirements listed below.  Please note that this is not a complete list; other eligibility factors will apply.

All potential donors must:

  • be at least 18 years old
  • weigh at least 110 lbs.
  • be in good health and feeling well
  • not be pregnant

 Whole Blood Donation

Whole blood is comprised of four main components; plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

Appointment Time: Approximately 45 minutes

Donation Process: Whole blood is collected from an arm vein and is performed by a nurse or phlebotomist.

A nurse or phlebotomist will cleanse and sterilize an area of the arm from which the blood will be drawn. The blood will flow through sterile tubing into a donation bag. The entire blood collection procedure takes about 7-10 minutes while approximately one pint of blood is collected. All materials used during the donation are pre-packaged, sterile, and disposable; once used, it is thrown away and destroyed.

Bone Marrow Donation

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found within the hollow interior of long bones such as the hip and thigh bones. The bone marrow contains stems cells that produce the body’s blood cells, which include white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.

Appointment Time: Approximately 1 hour

Donation Process: Bone marrow is removed from the pelvic bone and is performed by a licensed healthcare provider.

Donors are positioned on their belly and receive anesthesia to feel no pain during the donation. Liquid marrow is withdrawn from the back of the pelvic bone using a hollow needle. As the liquid marrow is removed, donors may experience a brief period of minimal to moderate discomfort. The entire procedure, once preparation is complete, typically takes 10–15 minutes.

White Blood Cell (Mononuclear Cell) Donation

White blood cells are one of the four main components of whole blood; red blood cells, platelets, and plasma make up the other three components. White blood cells are the body’s primary defense against infection; they have the ability to move out of the blood stream and reach tissue being invaded.

Appointment Time: Approximately 4 hours

Donation Process: White blood cells, particularly the mononuclear type of white blood cells, are collected from an arm vein by leukapheresis. Leukapheresis is the process of removing whole blood from the donor, separating the blood into its components, keeping the white blood cells, and then returning the remaining blood components to the donor.

A nurse or phlebotomist will cleanse and sterilize an area of the arm from which the blood will be drawn. The blood is sent through sterile tubing into a centrifuge located in a cell-separator machine. The machine spins the blood to separate the white blood cells from the other components. The white blood cells are collected and the remaining components are returned. Only a small portion of blood is in the machine at any time (less than a cup).  The entire procedure may take approximately 2-3 hours and is not uncomfortable.

White Blood Cell (Mononuclear Cell) Donation – Mobilized

White blood cells are one of the four main components of whole blood; red blood cells, platelets, and plasma make up the other three components. Mobilized white blood cells include stem cells mobilized from the bone marrow after treatment with an FDA-approved mobilizing agent.  These stem cells increase the total number of cells available in your blood and are a critical component in research studies.

Appointment Time: Approximately 1 hour for screen, 0.5 hours for treatment (2-5 times on successive days), and 4 hours for white blood cell collection – 1 or 2 successive days = total of 2-6 successive day appointments

Screen Process: You will be screened for eligibility for the mobile collection process, and if accepted, will receive first treatment by injection per protocol.

Treatment Process: You will receive the treatment by injection per the required protocol.

Donation Process: White blood cells, particularly the mononuclear type of white blood cells, are collected from an arm vein by leukapheresis. Leukapheresis is the process of removing whole blood from the donor, separating the blood into its components, keeping the white blood cells, and then returning the remaining blood components to the donor.

A nurse or phlebotomist will cleanse and sterilize an area of the arm from which the blood will be drawn. The blood is sent through sterile tubing into a centrifuge located in a cell-separator machine. The machine spins the blood to separate the white blood cells from the other components. The white blood cells are collected and the remaining components are returned. Only a small portion of blood is in the machine at any time (less than a cup).  The entire procedure may take approximately 4 hours and is not uncomfortable.